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Types of Sleeping Pills to Treat Insomnia and Other Related Conditions

Insomnia is a medical condition characterised by the inability to fall asleep or stay asleep. As a result, a lot of other health conditions can occur, which make it vital for you to get treatment.

Following a regular sleeping schedule, engaging in physical activities, and avoiding caffeine are some things that can help you sleep. But for people with severe insomnia, taking sleeping pills is the most viable solution.

The most commonly used and prescribed sleeping pills to treat insomnia and other sleeping disorders, can be categorized into non-benzodiazepine and benzodiazepine drugs. Benzodiazepine drugs are the most widely prescribed drugs for treating Insomnia and other sleeping disorders. But they also have cases of abuse or overdose. This can cause slow heart rate, nausea, apnoea, blurred vision etc.

Non-benzodiazepine sleeping pills on the other hand, have minimal side effects. Below is a list of the most commonly prescribed benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine sleeping pills.

Zolpidem

Zolpidem or Ambien is an effective sleeping pill which takes around 15 to 20 minutes to come in to effect. An extended version is used to help people sleep for a longer period of time. It is advisable not to take Zolpidem in large quantities or when alcohol has been consumed during the day.

Zopiclone

Zopiclone is used to treat difficulties in falling sleep, early awakening, frequent sleep walking and other insomnia related conditions. For adults, the recommended dose is of 7.5 mg taken orally.

Diazepam

Diazepam belongs to the benzodiazepine category and is used to treat anxiety disorders, alcohol withdrawal symptoms and muscle spasms. It is prohibited for pregnant women or people who have an allergy to diazepam or other similar drugs. It also goes by the name of Valium.

Alprazolam

Alprazolam is used for anxiety disorders, nausea due to chemotherapy, and panic disorders. It is an FDA approved drug and belongs to the benzodiazepine category. It comes into effect within a couple of hours of consumption. Again, full research and doctor’s consent must be sought before consumption.